86 posts categorized "Current Affairs"

25 August 2015

The best movie you never heard of?

Larry,

"Once again the residents LOVED the presentation! Please let me know what dates you have in October (I assume you don't have Sept dates available) and going forward.

Thanks!"

Mario Garcia

Enrichment Coordinator | Madison Estates

San Antonio, TX 78240

Cobb260r
(Courtesy: Warner Bros.)

I was humbled when I received this email from Mario the other day.  He was referring to my Movie Memories presentation titled "The Best Movies You've Never Heard Of."

I like to keep the contents of that presentation under wraps a bit because the surprise of some of the films we talk about adds to the fun.

Let's just say that Cobb, Ron Shelton's gritty-to-the-bone dramatic biography starring Tommy Lee Jones as legendary baseball Hall-of-Famer Ty Cobb, is on the list.

Cobb may be one of Jones' lesser-known dramas, but the way San Antonio's resident Academy Award winner gets under the skin and down to the icy cold soul of the arrogant, abusive Cobb is a cinematic ride you are not likely to soon forget.

So, thanks Madison Estates residents, for always welcoming my Movie Memories presentations warmly.  And a special thank you to enrichment coordinator Mario Garcia for the kind, humbling words.  I look forward to returning to Madison Estates next month for something a little different; my stand-up comedy presentation titled "We Might As Well Laugh."

Look, you can see 'The Invisible Woman'

Invisible260r
(Courtesy: Universal Pictures)

It sounds impossible, doesn't it?

It's true, though.  You can see The Invisible Woman, at least the classic 1940 sci-fi romantic-comedy co-starring Virginia Bruce, John Barrymore and John Howard, if you tune to classic TV cable channel TCM Tuesday night at 8:30.

That comic caper revolves around an attractive model (Bruce) with a few scores to settle.  She thinks being invisible might be just the ticket.  The Invisible Woman is just one of the vintage films I'm recommending this week.  Please note that all times listed are Central Daylight Time.  (Check your local listings for times in your area.)

And speaking of classic films with lady leads, Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke both took home Academy Awards for their performances as Annie Sullivan and Helen Keller, respectively, in Arthur Penn's The Miracle Worker (1962).  The mesmerizing biography-drama hits the MGM HD screen Sunday at 2:55 p.m.

This is also a big week for Greta Garbo fans.  Ninotchka (1939), one of all-time favorites, airs Wednesday at 5 p.m. on TCM.  I love the snappy banter between Garbo's title character, a stiff-as-nails Russian woman, and easy-going Leon, portrayed flawlessly by Melvyn Douglas.

In fact, at 10:45 Wednesday evening on TCM, you can light up the night with the second half of your own Garbo double-feature.  That's when Grand Hotel, Oscar's best picture of 1932, pairs the legendary Swedish actress with John Barrymore in a classic ensemble romantic-drama.

Some other choices of note:

  • Casablanca (1942), still the greatest film ever made in my humble opinion, heaps on romance and intrique at 7 p.m. Friday on TCM;
  • Meet John Doe (1941), featuring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck in a Frank Capra classic, on TCM at 12:30 p.m. Sunday;
  • Tombstone (1993), teaming Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer as Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday, respectively, at 6 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. Sunday on AMC and;
  • The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), Woody Allen's masterpiece about a dashing movie character (Jeff Daniels) who steps off the screen and into the life of a depressed woman (Mia Farrow) in the audience during the Great Depression.  It airs Sunday at 11:20 p.m. on MGM HD.

If I had to only pick one classic to watch this week, however, I'd hustle over to TCM Saturday at 7 p.m. for The Hustler (1961) just to see Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson and Jackie Gleason as Minnesota Fats chalk up their cue sticks and go at it one more time.

  

10 August 2015

Murray answers 'Ghostbusters' call

Murray275l
(Courtesy: gossipmagazines.net)

Stand down, Ghostbusters nation, Bill Murray has finally answered the call.

The Hollywood Reporter is reporting (which is what they do best) that Murray "ain't afraid of no reboot."

That may be a recent development.  The standout star of the original Ghostbusters in 1984 and the not-as-magical 1989 sequel (GhostbuIsters II) has been coy and reportedly resistant about strapping on the ghostbusting gear for the third time for years.

If the Hollywood Reporter report holds up, however, the utterly likable actor will take the plunge in director Paul Feig's upcoming gender-bender, which will star established big-screen comic stars Melissa McCarthy and Kristen Wiig and Saturday Night Live cast members Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones.

The latest installment is set to open next July.

"Murray has has long been resistant to star in a third Ghostbusters. He told David Letterman earlier this year that his hesitancy stems from Ghostbusters II not having been as well-received as the first one," the Hollywood Reporter post states.

Sequels are tough to pull off, especially one that arrives more than a quarter of a century after the previous sequel.  And there's this:  Will Feig's reboot please members of the mighty Ghostbusters cult?

This I know.  It'll have to go some to out ghostbust the '84 original directed by Ivan Reitman and starring Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver and Harold Ramis.

   

04 August 2015

ScreenGems: 'That's the press, baby'

Deadline285
(Courtesy: 20th Century-Fox)

A post on The Hollywood Reporter website caught my eye.

I have to respectfully wonder if the writers really managed to round up what they call the "Best and worst journalists in film."

All the President's Men, the excellent 1976 political/journalism drama about the Watergate Scandal and the fall of President Richard Nixon starring Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford as Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, is No. 2 out of 15 in the Hollywood Reporter gallery. 

My favorite Cameron Crowe movie, Almost Famous (2000), slides in as No. 3.  Crowe was absolutely on top of his film-making game with this symphony of chaos, thrills and surprises when a young writer (Patrick Fugit) lands a seat on a rock 'n' roll group's bus.  What a ride for him and for those of us sitting in a darkened theater hoping to jump on the bus at the next stop.

From this aisle seat, though, the Hollywood Reporter list is as significant for movies left off the list as those included.

I have no problem giving the list kudos for State of Play, Kevin Macdonald's cinematic hash of drama, crime and mystery revolving around Washington, D.C. journalist -- let's just go ahead and say it, a newspaperman (Remember those?) -- portrayed by Russell Crowe.  Rachel McAdams and Ben Affleck co-star.  The best thing State of Play does, though, is blend old school, traditional journalism with New Age electronic reporting.

Like or hate what journalism has morphed into, State of Play captures very well the two-headed frustrations and the benefits of changing times in journalism.

I get it.  I'm on board with the 24-hour news cycle that has spread like wildfire (or a virus, depending on your point of view) from TV to the Internet and, sadly (depending on your point of view), to newspaper newsrooms.

Re:  The Hollywood Reporter gallery, though, I would include True Crime, the 1999 mystery crime-drama starring (and directed by) Clint Eastwood as alcohol-soaked womanizer Steve Everett, who also happens to be a talented writer for an Oakland newspaper.

And what about Deadline - U.S.A., a personal favorite?  Humphrey Bogart fights to take down a powerful crime boss in that 1952 crime-drama with newspaper presses sometimes rumbling in the background.

In my Movie Memories presentations, I often talk about my Mom letting me stay up way past my bedtime when I was a kid to watch old movies on the Late, Late Show (when it was a TV programming device and not a talk show).  That's when I first saw Bogart take on the mob in Deadline - U.S.A.

Because I'll always remember sharing that moving drama and other classics like them with my Mom and because I'll never get newsprint ink out of my blood (or even want to), Deadline - U.S.A. becomes the first movie in a new Movie Memories feature I'm calling ScreenGems; classic moments in classic movies.

That's the press, baby!

    

03 August 2015

(Dan) Rather interesting, this

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Robert Redford, left, portrays Dan Rather in "Truth." (Courtesy: hollywoodreporter.com)

Can you see Robert Redford as Dan Rather?

Let me put that another way.

You can see screen legend Redford as the Houston-born news legend Rather on the big screen as early as Oct. 16, according to an article posted on the Hollywood Reporter website.

The film, to be released by Sony Pictures Classics, is titled Truth.  According to the Hollywood Reporter post, it "tells of the firestorm that erupted in September of 2004 after Rather reported that George W. Bush had received special treatment while serving in the Air National Guard during the Vietnam War."

In addition to the drama starring Redford as Rather, Cate Blanchett portrays Mary Mapes, Rather’s producer.  The plot, of course, is driven by the former CBS anchor’s fall from grace.

The plan appears to be a slow roll-out.  Truth will only be told in New York and L.A. at first with other cities to be added later, apparently.

So, as they say, stay tuned.

27 July 2015

You can hear them now; just ask

Movies290Do you have trouble hearing your favorite movie stars when you're watching them on the big screen in a theater?

Did you know that most movie house chains now offer listening devices to solve that problem for you and make your movie outing a pleasure again?

Some people who have no hearing loss will likely say something like, "Hey, they already blast the sound in movie houses, what could possibly be the problem?"

To that, you (and I) might reply, "What?"

Of course for many of us, including some who haven't quite admitted it or even faced it yet, hearing loss can take the fun out of going to the movies.

Well, it's time to let the good times roll again.

According to an article posted on the ideasconsultinginc.com website titled "Now Hear This," the solution could be as simple as asking for an assisted listening device at the box office window.

Click here to read the article.

20 July 2015

Raging bull and 'Raging Bull'

RagingBull275
(Courtesy: United Artists)

Thirty-five years ago this month I got paid to review a movie for the first time.

Reluctantly leaving behind semi-stunned family and friends, I ventured south from the relative comfort and financial security of an enjoyable dead-end job in Dallas to pursue a dream to forge a career as a professional film critic.

Looking back, I'm grateful I landed at the Valley Morning Star, a small daily newspaper in sleepy (at the time) Harlingen, located in far South Texas.  The locals and "winter Texans" call it The Valley.

The Valley is not quite Mexico, which my dad used to call Old Mexico, but it's close.  Let's put it this way.  You don't have to stop at a Texas Border Patrol checkpoint going south on Highway. 281, but you do when you're headed north.

I had what they now call a hidden agenda when I took the lowest-rung job (compiling the scoreboard page) in the sports department at the Valley Morning Star.  The world was just waiting for my knowledgeable, witty comments in the world of film criticism.  It was just that no one but me realized it at the time, which was 1980.  April 1, 1980, in fact. 

Yes, I launched the career that has taken me around the U.S. numerous times, to foreign countries including France, Great Britain and Scotland, to the Academy Awards, to a position as film critic for the NBC News Channel and to the Cannes Film Festival (among others) on, uh, April Fools' Day.

Looking back, that explains so much.  But to stay focused here, 1980 was a very good year for quality, memorable movies. The Elephant Man opened that year, and so did The Blues Brothers, Ordinary People and The Shining; you know, the one where a crazed writer played by Jack Nicholson crashes the bathroom door to get to his terrified wife while yelling, "H-E-E-E-E-R-S JOHNNY!"

Raging Bull, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro in a brilliant performance as raging  boxer-with-issues JaKe LaMotta, opened in December that year.  In my humble opinion, Raging Bull exploded on the screen as the finest film of the decade.

My first review, however, was none of those.

It took me about three months to convince the extremely understanding folks at the Valley Morning Star that what their already fine newspaper needed was a film critic.  So on the morning of July 2, I -- with notepad and Mild Duds in hand -- took a seat in a Harlingen movie house to review Airplane!

Airplane290
(Courtesy: Paramount Pictures)

For those who may not be familiar with the wildly comic spoof of every airplane disaster movie (but especially Zero Hour) that had come before, co-writers and co-directors Jim Abrahams, David Zucker and Jerry Zucker pulled out all the stops from wordplay jokes ("Surely you can't be serious."  "I am serious, and don't call me Shirley.") to physical humor like a line of passengers (including a nun with a mean right slap) taking turns to "convince" a hysterical female passenger to get a grip.

I had no idea what the filmmakers and hilarious co-stars Leslie Nielsen, Lloyd Bridges, Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty and Peter Graves were doing, except that it appeared everyone was channeling the Marx Bros. and somehow justifying mayhem and silliness for a new era.

I managed to hold on to my notepad, which examined later was a jumbled mess of wildly drawn lines and OMG! before OMG was cool (if it really is or ever was).  It may also be the only time in 35 years of reviewing movies that I ever dropped a Milk Dud.

I realized before the lights even came up that I had a decision to make.  Airplane! was clearly either a revolutionary new high in lowbrow comedy, or the dumbest movie I had ever seen.

Luckily, I went with both gut feelings.  Airplane! landed a spot in cinematic history as just that, a cutting-edge dose of lunacy that has inspired scores of imitators.

Recollection of experiences like that and other stops along the path of an entertainment journalist specializing in cinema forged what has become Movie Memories, the public speaking chapter of a life often best lived in the dark.

Mild Duds, anyone?

           

17 July 2015

Thanks for the Movie Memories

Madison350Thanks to all the fine folks over at Madison Estates in San Antonio for the warm, enthusiastic reception to my Movie Memories presentation "Movies Set in the Lone Star State" Thursday evening.

I was overwhelmed by the great turnout as we began and ended our cinematic journey with Alamo movies; John Wayne's classic of 1960 and the more recent 2004 version, directed by Texan John Lee Hancock and featuring Billy Bob Thornton as Davy Crockett.

In between, we discussed almost a dozen more movies set in Texas.  One of the ladies in the audience had just two words to say about the trailer of Peter Bogdanovich's 1971 black-and-white gem The Last Picture Show, shot in Archer City and based on Larry McMurtry's novel.

All she had to say was, "Ben Johnson," out of respect for the great character actor and his stunning performance as Sam the Lion.

 

Thanks again, all the folks at Madison Estates.  It was a great night of Movie Memories.  See you all in August for one of my favorite presentations, "The Best Movies You've Never Heard Of."

Want to catch some classic films on TV?

Thinking about taking a trip soon?

Strangers290
(Courtesy: Warner Bros.)

You might think twice about getting too chatty with the stranger who sits down next to you, especially if you follow my advice and check out Alfred Hitchcock's superb 1951 crime-thriller Strangers on a Train, which airs Friday at 3:45 p.m. on TCM.

That's the first suggestion in this week's Movie Memories guide to classic films on TV.  Remember, all times listed here are Central Daylight Time.  (Check your local listings.)

It all seems innocent enough at first in Strangers on a Train.  After chitchatting for a while, two train passengers (Farley Granger and Robert Walker) eventually get around to coming up with a surefire double murder plot.  Bruno (Walker) has someone he'd like to see gone, and, as it turns out, so does Guy (Granger).

Idle talk, on what seems like it at first, leads to intrigue, some of the finest black and white cinematography you'll see (Oscar nominated, in fact) and a signature cameo by director Alfred Hitchcock himself.  Look for Hitchcock as the portly fellow boarding the train with a double bass.

 

Lolita265
(Courtesy: MGM)

Speaking of relationships that are and appear to be flirting with danger, James Mason portrays a college professor infatuated by a 14-year-old girl in Stanley Kubrick's taboo-flaunting romantic-drama Lolita.  Based on Vladimir Nabokov's novel, Lolita heats up TV screens Saturday at 4:15 p.m. on TCM.

Guys and Dolls, the musical-comedy starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons and Frank Sinatra, airs at 12:15 p.m. Sunday on TCM.

Brando admitted in interviews after the film came out that it took quite a bit of editing to get his singing on Luck Be a Lady anywhere near presentable.

One of the great silent classics, Metropolis of 1926, takes over TCM Sunday at 7 p.m.  Fritz Lang's silent sci-fi drama about a futuristic city in turmoil is a must-see, especially for those who have never seen it.

Also:  Errol Flynn swashes and buckles for the first time on screen in the pirate adventure Captain Blood (1935), airing at 5 a.m. Saturday on TCM; and you'll get another powerful dose of film noir in the 1957 drama Sweet Smell of Success, which showcases Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis and lights up MGM HD Saturday at 5 p.m.

If I had to pick just one to enjoy this week, however, I think I'd tune to TCM at 7 p.m. Saturday and catch Robert Redford in the title role as The Candidate (1972).

Peter Boyle and Melvyn Douglas are among the co-stars in the tale of an attorney (Redford) running for the U.S. Senate.  He's a do-gooder, so the question is whether or not he can maintain his integrity over the long haul.

It is, after all, the political season once again.  Or haven't you noticed?

14 July 2015

Classic films to catch on TV this week

Strangers290
(Courtesy: Warner Bros.)

Going on a trip soon?

You might think twice about getting too chatty with the stranger who sits down next to you, especially if you follow my advice and check out Alfred Hitchcock's superb 1951 crime-thriller Strangers on a Train, which airs Friday at 3:45 p.m. on TCM.

That's the first suggestion in this week's Movie Memories guide to classic films on TV.  Remember, all times listed here are Central Daylight Time.  (Check your local listings.)

It all seems innocent enough at first in Strangers on a Train.  After chitchatting for a while, two train passengers (Farley Granger and Robert Walker) eventually get around to coming up with a surefire double murder plot.  Bruno (Walker) has someone he'd like to see gone, and, as it turns out, so does Guy (Granger).

Idle talk, on what seems like it at first, leads to intrigue, some of the finest black and white cinematography you'll see (Oscar nominated, in fact) and a signature cameo by director Alfred Hitchcock himself.  Look for Hitchcock as the portly fellow boarding the train with a double bass.

If you're in the mood for something diametrically opposite of Hitchcock's subtle film noir, you might want to get down to business with Dennis Quaid as he gets under the rock 'n roll skin of Jerry Lee Lewis in Great Balls of Fire!

Quaid, like his cinematic inspiration in real life, would very much like to shake your nerves and rattle your brain in the 1989 biopic of highly controversial rocker Lewis directed by Jim McBride and co-starring Winona Ryder as Lewis' young object of affection.

Goodness gracious, Great Balls of Fire! airs at 6:55 p.m. Wednesday on MGM HD.

  

Lolita265
(Courtesy: MGM)

Speaking of relationships that are and appear to be flirting with danger, James Mason portrays a college professor infatuated by a 14-year-old girl in Stanley Kubrick's taboo-flaunting romantic-drama Lolita.  Based on Vladimir Nabokov's novel, Lolita heats up TV screens Saturday at 4:15 p.m. on TCM.

Guys and Dolls, the musical-comedy starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons and Frank Sinatra, airs at 12:15 p.m. Sunday on TCM.

Brando admitted in interviews after the film came out that it took quite a bit of editing to get his singing on Luck Be a Lady anywhere near presentable.

One of the great silent classics, Metropolis of 1926, takes over TCM Sunday at 7 p.m.  Fritz Lang's silent sci-fi drama about a futuristic city in turmoil is a must-see, especially for those who have never seen it.

Also:  John Wayne's on the trail of a Civil War traitor in Howard Hawks' classic Western Rio Lobo (1970) at 1 a.m. Friday on TCM; Errol Flynn swashes and buckles for the first time on screen in the pirate adventure Captain Blood (1935), airing at 5 a.m. Saturday on TCM; and you'll get another powerful dose of film noir in the 1957 drama Sweet Smell of Success, which showcases Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis and lights up MGM HD Saturday at 5 p.m.

If I had to pick just one to enjoy this week, however, I think I'd tune to TCM at 7 p.m. Saturday and catch Robert Redford in the title role as The Candidate (1972).

Peter Boyle and Melvyn Douglas are among the co-stars in the tale of an attorney (Redford) running for the U.S. Senate.  He's a do-gooder, so the question is whether or not he can maintain his integrity over the long haul.

It is, after all, the political season once again.  Or haven't you noticed?

        

10 July 2015

R.I.P.: Omar Sharif

OmarFunnyGirl275
Omar Sharif and Barbra Streisand in "Funny Girl." (Columbia Pictures)

In the outstanding Broadway musical-turned movie Funny Girl (1968), vaudeville star Fanny Brice (Barbra Streisand) calls good-looking gambler, future husband Nick Arnstein (Omar Sharif) "My first ruffled shirt."

I have no idea why that line has stuck with me for 47 years.  But it has.

And now, the news this morning that Sharif, the Franco-Arabic actor most will remember from David Lean's sweeping epic Lawrence of Arabia (1962), has died of a reported heart attack at 83.

BBC News is reporting that Sharif passed away in a Cairo hotel room.

"Egypt-born Sharif won two Golden Globe awards and an Oscar nomination for his role as Sherif Ali in David Lean's 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia.

He won a further Golden Globe three years later for Doctor Zhivago.

Earlier this year, his agent confirmed he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

His agent Steve Kenis said: 'He suffered a heart attack this afternoon in a hospital in Cairo,'" the BBC post reported.

07 July 2015

All we have to fear is ... Look out!

MaskMan265
(Courtesy: halloween-masks.com)
Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd president of the United States, once said, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

That sounds good, but the only president to be elected to the White House four times never saw my older brother slip on his old-man mask, or false face, as my grandmother used to call them, and terrorize your humble scribe.
 
We run into fear quite often while we're safely sequestered (relatively speaking) in darkened movie theaters.  Usually, of course, the square-jawed heroes of the big screen do a pretty decent job of dispatching the evil forces before the end credits.
 
As I mention in the latest edition of my Getting Reel column in The Senior Voice newspaper, though, when you're a kid and your older brother likes to taunt you with an old-man false face, fear can send chills up your spine in the sanctity of your own bedroom.
 
The article begins with a simple question:  What scares you?
 
Click here to read my Getting Reel column about what makes us shiver with fright in the dark.

The classic movie what to watch watch

DayEarth275
Gort, the enforcer robot, left, and Klaatu (Michael Rennie) in "The Day the Earth Stood Still." (20th Century Fox)
As usual, I've checked out the various classic movie channels to guide you through some highlights of what you might want to watch this week when it comes to classic films on TV.
 
There's no lack of delightful and/or dramatic and/or even sci-fi classics from which to choose.  I'm most excited about the eerie 1951 gem The Day the Earth Stood Still, airing Thursday at midnight (all times Central Daylight) on TCM.
 
Michael Rennie is out front as the alien Klaatu, who lands on Earth packing a stern warning and a heavy-metal enforcer robot named Gort.
 
Hitting the screen on the heels of World War II, The Day the Earth Stood Still, directed by Robert Wise (The Sound of Music, West Side Story), gets a little preachy about how Earthlings need to just get along or else, and it's a deadly OR ELSE.
 
Patricia Neal, who would win her only Academy Award a decade later trying to fight off Paul Newman's romantic advances in Hud (1963), is very good here as a World War II widow trying to raise a son and falling for an extremely mysterious stranger.
 
This is also the week that cinematic classics take us to heaven and Hades.  In the dramatic comic-fantasy Heaven Can Wait, circa 1943 and directed by Ernst Lubitsch, a playboy played by Don Ameche arrives at the gates of hell and may or may not be up to hell's standards, or should we say down to hell's standards?
 
To find out, tune to TCM Wednesday at 9:45 a.m.
 
But wait, as they say on those nauseating TV commercials, there's more.  In Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941), Sunday at 11 a.m. on TCM, a boxer played by Robert Montgomery is sent to heaven 50 years early by mistake and must return to Earth as a millionaire playboy.
 
Just don't confuse Here Comes Mr. Jordan or its 1978 remake Heaven Can Wait (starring Warren Beatty) with the the Heaven Can Wait of 1943.  They are as different as, well, heaven and that other place.  You know, down there.
 
For me, another must-see this week is The Shop Around the Corner, the quirky romantic-comedy pairing Jimmy Stewart and Margaret Sullavan.  Also directed by Ernst Lubitsch (Heaven Can Wait, 1943), The Shop Around the Corner (Saturday at 7 p.m. on TCM) weaves a tangled tale of pen-pal romance involving co-workers who are quite sure they can't stand each other. 
 
Alfred Hitchcock fans might want to check out Cary Grant in North By Northwest Wednesday at 9 p.m. on TCM, while fans of Westerns have a couple to choose from this week.
 
John Ford's How the West Was Won, starring Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne and Gregory Peck, hits the small screen on TCM at 11 a.m. Saturday, and Wayne hits the trail in a monumental cattle drive in Howard Hawks' Red River (1948), also starring Montgomery Clift and Joanne Dru, at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday on MGM HD.
 
If I had to pick just one, though, I'd be watching for an alien spacecraft hovering above Washington, D.C. in The Day the Earth Stood Still at midnight Thursday on TCM.